Enhancing the production, processing and distribution of local foods in Northwestern Ontario 

April 2019

CLFC emerged from a desire among farmers in the Dryden area to be better connected to potential markets. This upbeat video describes how an on-line local food distribution system, that covers a vast geographic area with sparse population, functions to benefit producers, processors and restaurants featuring local food. CLFC has grown very rapidly since its beginning in 2013. What started with just 85 members in the Dryden community has now grown to a current membership of over 1,500 in more than eight hub communities across Northwestern Ontario, with expansion to more communities currently under way. All products are sold through the co-op’s website (www.cloverbeltlocalfoodcoop.com), which operates year-round.

About the Social Economy of Food Video Series

The Social Economy of Food Video Series showcases local leaders that are using food to improve their communities by enhancing the local and social economies. Watch the complete series here.

Other videos in the series:

Can you DIG this video? Setting down roots for a healthy and sustainable food system

Durham Integrated Growers for a Sustainable Community (DIG) focuses on people working together to grow food in a healthy sustainable way. As the new video shows, this is partly about people getting their hands dirty as they grow food in and near Durham Region cities and towns.  However, it is also about supporting communities to grow, process, distribute, and sell food in ways that are best for them. It is about teaching skills around growing food in communities, promoting urban agriculture as a key ingredient for resilient communities and a sustainable food system, and advocating for greater policy support for urban agriculture. Watch the following video to get a better sense about what DIG digs!

About the Social Economy of Food Video Series 

The Social Economy of Food Video Series showcases local leaders that are using food to improve their communities by enhancing the local and social economies. Watch the complete series here.

Other videos in the series: 

Hidden Harvest Ottawa has big dreams for a greener Ottawa. What are yours?

By Phil Mount

August 2018

Imagine if every time you purchased $100 worth of groceries, your grocery store donated $25—or 1/4 of their ‘harvest’—to their local food bank. This is the scale of charitable benefits that Hidden Harvest supports in Ottawa.

Hidden Harvest’s impactful new video describes the benefits of gleaning to the uninitiated, and follows with a series of recommendations challenging municipal political leaders to make their community’s future “the most sustainable future it can be”. The video captures the essence of the Nourishing Communities Hidden Harvest Case Study by Chloé Poitevin DesRivières, released earlier this year. That case study found that, along with benefits to local food access agencies and processors, the services Hidden Harvest offers to the community and the city by creating alternate means to feed people, manage renewable resources, developing green infrastructure, and diverting waste from landfills speak to the aims of different city offices, including community and social services, energy planning, and forestry services.

This new video makes the case that the exceptional value in the public services produced through largely voluntary labour deserves the support of public officials.

About the Social Economy of Food Video Series 

The Social Economy of Food Video Series showcases local leaders that are using food to improve their communities by enhancing the local and social economies. Watch the complete series here.

Other videos in the series: