Exploring Community Stories About “Fish as Food”

August 2018

Written by Kristen Lowitt

In May 2018, members of the FLEdGE Northwestern Ontario Research Node hosted a “fish as food” roundtable session at the Community Conservation and Livelihoods Conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The session featured community stories on “fish as food” from the Northwest Territories to Nova Scotia. Collectively, the stories illustrate the importance of not seeing fisheries solely as an assortment of fish harvesters or fish stocks, but as part of larger food systems that provide for community sustenance, cultures, and economies. Co-organized by Kristen Lowitt and Charles Levkoe, the session builds on their ongoing FLEdGE research exploring the links between sustainable fisheries and food systems in the Lake Superior region of Northwestern Ontario. Continue reading “Exploring Community Stories About “Fish as Food””

Food systems are critical to urban resilience

By Patricia Ballamingie
July 15, 2018

Thanks to the international networking of FLEdGE PI Alison Blay-Palmer, FLEdGE researchers and partners were invited to present a panel on Building resilient food systems: Policy across multiple scales at the ICLEI World Congress 2018, held in Montreal, June 20-22.

Since ICLEI’s inception, urban resilience and sustainability have largely been framed in terms of climate change mitigation and adaption. But as food system scholars and practitioners know, food serves as a portal to those and so many other related socio-economic and environmental issues. And cities play a crucial role in achieving food security, optimizing health and advancing environmental sustainability. Food production and food access programs target predominantly urban populations; urban, peri-urban, and rural areas remain closely interrelated; and the municipal level proves the most effective and efficient for many food policies and programs to occur. Continue reading “Food systems are critical to urban resilience”

Report on the Fifth Annual EAT Stockholm Food Forum

July 2018

EAT Stockholm Food Fora have been held every year since 2014. As a “science-based global platform for food system transformation,” the EAT initiative partners with a range of foundations, academic institutions, organizations and companies. The underlying principle is that everybody on earth has the right to healthy diets within planetary boundaries.

For the first time, the 2018 forum, “Stepping Out of the Comfort Zone,” was co-hosted by EAT and the Swedish Ministry of International Development Cooperation and Climate Change and gathered more 600 participants from science, politics, business and civil society from over 50 countries. Continue reading “Report on the Fifth Annual EAT Stockholm Food Forum”

Place-Based Food Systems 2018:  Making the Case, Making it Happen

Metro Vancouver, August 9-10th, 2018
Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Richmond, BC
#pbfs2018

A two-day conference will draw together scholars and community leaders to share the latest research and actions, building capacity for place-based food systems. Participants will leave fortified with knowledge and understanding of the latest and best work making the case for place-based food systems, as well as innovative practices putting place-based food systems into action. The event aims to give participants an empowering vision of the critical role that place-based food systems can and will play in achieving our sustainable economic, ecological, and societal futures, as well as a revitalized dedication to strategic, collaborative, and forceful strategies moving forward.

The conference is being convened by Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU), in Richmond BC. “We absolutely need a food system that is about growing wholesome, nutritious food for people. And we need a food system that is configured and operates for the benefit of people and communities as opposed to the coffers of transnational corporations,” says Dr. Kent Mullinix, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Food Systems at KPU and conference co-organizer. “This conference is about bringing together researchers and practitioners to advance that critical vision.” Continue reading “Place-Based Food Systems 2018:  Making the Case, Making it Happen”

A Taste of Diversity: The 2018 Conference of the Canadian Association for Food Studies

June 2018

By Andrea Noriega

In keeping with the Congress 2018 theme of “Gathering Diversities” the theme of this year’s Canadian Association for Food Studies (CAFS) conference was “Growing Diversities,” and it held true to it’s name! With the sensory saturated experience of last year’s conference still ringing in the minds of CAFS attendees, the open-arm-hospitality of the University of Regina (host of the 2018 Congress) was an unexpected but welcome change for many.

Neatly nestled in the quiet but picturesque skirt of Wascana Park, this year’s conference surely reminded many about what the different shades of Canadian diversity can look like. And, in contrast to the 2017 Congress, the term diversity—particularly as it pertains to food studies—took on a more salient meaning than in has in past years. Continue reading “A Taste of Diversity: The 2018 Conference of the Canadian Association for Food Studies”

How to Improve Northern Ontario Food Systems: The 4 Next Steps

By Alison Earls, BA., MEDI.

Over the summer I was thrilled to work as a research assistant for Food Locally Embedded Globally Engaged (FLEdGE). I grew up in a small rural farming community food and food systems were a central part of my life from a young age, so getting the chance to study these systems, specifically infrastructure for Northern Ontario food systems, was a dream come true.

Although I have experience with local food and food systems research, I was a bit out of my comfort zone with the geography of the project, which took place in Northern Ontario. I am very familiar with the opportunities and obstacles that are available for food and farms in Southern Ontario but, at the beginning of the project, food and farming in Northern Ontario was new to me. Before starting the project, I would have said that the food systems in Northern and Southern Ontario have similar challenges and opportunities, however this is not the case. Continue reading “How to Improve Northern Ontario Food Systems: The 4 Next Steps”