News & Events

Save the Date! Levers for Food Systems Change: A Panel Discussion on Urban Food Security, Food Justice, and International Agreements

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018
9:00 am – 10:30 am
Balsillie School of International Affairs, Room 142

Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/levers-for-food-systems-change-a-panel-discussion-on-urban-food-security-food-justice-and-tickets-50375385133

Over the last three years various international agreements have highlighted the need for greater coordination along the food chain and increased food justice in creating urban food security. These international agreements have set the stage for new urban food policy to emerge. At this panel discussion, food system experts from Wilfrid Laurier University, Carleton University, and the City of Toronto will explore how we can use the New Urban Agenda and other international agreements (SDGs and the Milan Urban Food Policy Pact) as levers for changing the food system.

 A light breakfast will be served. Registration is free but required. Continue reading “Save the Date! Levers for Food Systems Change: A Panel Discussion on Urban Food Security, Food Justice, and International Agreements”

Su Morin Food Justice Scholarship

Su Morin was a fearless fighter for food justice. No battle was too small, and every pollinator plant and every heirloom vegetable counted on the journey to better food and better communities. Her boundless knowledge and generous sharing of seeds and seedlings leave a legacy in many gardens throughout Ontario and Nova Scotia. This legacy is extended through the many students who had Su as a mentor and who absorbed her contagious love for seeds and nature. Her past work with the Canadian Organic Growers and Seeds of Diversity made her known in food justice circles across Canada. More recently, Su worked with the Ecology Action Centre in Nova Scotia where she further influenced colleagues and students with her passion for community gardens, seed saving, and community food security.

In the spirit of Su, a travel and research scholarship in the amount of $500 is being offered to fourth year undergraduate and graduate students for research and/or travel expenses. To apply for this award, please submit a 250-word essay describing how you will use the funding and how this contributes to food justice. Please send your submission to Irena Knezevic at: Irena.Knezevic@carleton.ca including ‘Su Morin Food Justice Scholarship’ in the subject line.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2018 with a decision by mid-January 2019.​

 

Tickets for the Annual Conference of the Canadian Horticultural Therapy Association Now Available!

Willow Springs Creative Centre is thrilled to be hosting the upcoming Annual Conference of the Canadian Horticultural Therapy Association entitled

‘Connecting with the Land: Wellness through the Boreal Forest’

Please help us spread the word about this gathering of people who recognize the importance of people reconnecting with nature, using gardening and the land to help facilitate healing and wellbeing in everyone. Please consider attending the conference or supporting one of your staff members to attend!

Please post and share this brochure widely, with your colleagues and contacts.

CHTA Conference Brochure

If you have any questions or require additional information please do not hesitate to contact Judi Vinni, Coordinator, Willow Springs Creative Centre.

The Tenth Annual Fall Harvest in Yellowknife This Week!

Aug. 22, 2018 
For Immediate Release

Yellowknife – Growing food in the Northwest Territories involves a lot of time and energy to overcome some significant challenges, but communities all over the region are proving that it can be done. It’s a feat that will be celebrated at the tenth annual Harvest Fall Fair this week in Yellowknife.

Hosted by Ecology North, Yellowknives Dene First Nation Dechita Naowo program and the Yellowknife Community Garden Collective, the Fall Fair brings communities together to celebrate food growing. This year, Wilfrid Laurier University is sponsoring a free community bison burger feast at the Yellowknives Dene First Nation Wiiliideh Site on Aug. 25. The contribution is a celebration of Laurier’s newly opened Yellowknife research office, a natural continuation of FLEdGE and Laurier’s strong commitment to research in the Northwest Territories. Continue reading “The Tenth Annual Fall Harvest in Yellowknife This Week!”

Exploring Community Stories About “Fish as Food”

August 2018

Written by Kristen Lowitt

In May 2018, members of the FLEdGE Northwestern Ontario Research Node hosted a “fish as food” roundtable session at the Community Conservation and Livelihoods Conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The session featured community stories on “fish as food” from the Northwest Territories to Nova Scotia. Collectively, the stories illustrate the importance of not seeing fisheries solely as an assortment of fish harvesters or fish stocks, but as part of larger food systems that provide for community sustenance, cultures, and economies. Co-organized by Kristen Lowitt and Charles Levkoe, the session builds on their ongoing FLEdGE research exploring the links between sustainable fisheries and food systems in the Lake Superior region of Northwestern Ontario. Continue reading “Exploring Community Stories About “Fish as Food””

Hidden Harvest Ottawa has big dreams for a greener Ottawa. What are yours?

August 2018

Imagine if every time you purchased $100 worth of groceries, your grocery store donated $25—or 1/4 of their ‘harvest’—to their local food bank. This is the scale of charitable benefits that Hidden Harvest supports in Ottawa.

Hidden Harvest’s impactful new video describes the benefits of gleaning to the uninitiated, and follows with a series of recommendations challenging municipal political leaders to make their community’s future “the most sustainable future it can be”. The video captures the essence of the Nourishing Communities Hidden Harvest Case Study by Chloé Poitevin DesRivières, released earlier this year. That case study found that, along with benefits to local food access agencies and processors, the services Hidden Harvest offers to the community and the city by creating alternate means to feed people, manage renewable resources, developing green infrastructure, and diverting waste from landfills speak to the aims of different city offices, including community and social services, energy planning, and forestry services.

This new video makes the case that the exceptional value in the public services produced through largely voluntary labour deserves the support of public officials.

Post by Phil Mount.