Considerations for Seed Security and Biodiversity Conservation in Newfoundland

This research explores and assesses various perspectives on seed security issues in Newfoundland and is meant to inform the creation of an action plan for seed security work in Newfoundland in coming years.

Drawing on ten interviews with individuals actively involved with seed saving and conservation, the report describes recent seed security efforts on the island and the current needs and assets.The unique conditions on the island include short growing seasons to harsh climatic conditions in the winter months, making the availability of locally adapted seed crucially important. Public interest in seed security is on the rise but local resources and funding to support seed activities is limited. The demand for locally sourced seed is significant but there are still few seed-savers. There is good seed access on the island and seeds are generally available at the quality and quantity farmers want and need, however, many seed varieties are considered to be very expensive. There is significant concern for endangered local varieties and erosion of genetic diversity, in particular with respect to Newfoundland heritage potato seed. The study could not conclusively determine the feasibility of developing a seed bank in Newfoundland.

This research was made possible by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council through the Food: Locally Embedded, Globally Engaged partnership and the support from the Atlantic Canadian Organic Regional Network, The Bauta Family Initiative on Canadian Seed Security and Echo Foundation. The findings presented here do not necessarily reflect those of the Atlantic Canadian Organic Regional Network, The Bauta Family Initiative on Canadian Seed Security, or Echo Foundation.

Please see below the full report:

considerations-for-seed-security-and-biodiversity-conversation-in-newfoundland